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Wineries tap Facebook for a good cause, Bottle Shock ‘hard to swallow’

by TrevR on August 8, 2008

It’s Friday, we’re ready for some rest and relaxation and have just caught up on our Napa Valley reading. What caught our eye? Here goes…

Four wineries, including Girard from Napa, team to launch Facebook application
We’ve written before here about how most local wineries are missing the boat when it comes to online marketing–particularly as it pertains to social networks like Facebook. Well, this week a group of four wineries, including Napa Valley’s Girard Winery, have joined forces on the “Green My Vino” Facebook Application.

In a nutshell, the application enables Facebook users to give each other free online gifts worth One Minute, Five Minutes, and Ten Minutes of renewable energy. Each free gift adds Minutes towards a goal. Once the goal is met, a participating winery will commit to power their entire operations with renewable energy through Village Green. More information can be found here.

It’s a very cool (pun intended) concept and one we’ll be keeping an eye on.

Bottle Shock still not feeling the love
Several months ago we wrote about a film set in the Napa Valley–Bottle Shock–noting in our post that viewers at the Sundance Film Festival were not too impressed. Today, TIME is out with its take on the film, which is out this week in select theaters.

Here’s an excerpt:

All of this is presented at an amiably ambling, if just barely competent, pace by Miller and his agreeable, if something less than exciting, cast, with lots of screen time devoted to beauty shots of the Napa Valley basking expectantly in the summer sun.

And TIME concludes:

…the lack of authentic surprise and eccentricity in the story and its characters, the sense that everyone concerned with the picture (possibly excepting Rickman, who projects an unwelcoming sullenness that may not be funny but is at least weirdly human) is eagerly looking for the easy way out, is mildly dismaying. I’m sure that by this time some reviewer has applied the word “Capraesque” to Bottle Shock. If I were one of its makers I would not necessarily take that as a compliment.

Guess the decidedly spammy and lame online “marketing” around the film didn’t pay off…

[techtags: Napa, Napa Valley, wine, winery, Bottle Shock, Facebook, Girard Winery, Green My Vino]

About the Author

has written 716 posts on The Cork Board. He was born and aged in the Napa Valley and has a passion for wine, writing and social media, which led him to co-found this blog in early 2007. Follow him on Twitter @TrevR.

  • http://dkarch.tumblr.com/ Derek

    Ok. I see where the critics are coming from with Bottle Shock. The plot is disjointed. And there is little resolution to various stories they’re trying to tell. Still, I love the movie and though it connected with a certain passion about wine in Napa. (Again, I agree the film has flaws.)

    That said (and not really intending to rehash ground already well-trod), it is absolutely unacceptable that they allowed some PR flaks to spam blogs with comments. (As a PR pro I’m embarrassed by it. If I hadn’t seen the movie already I would avoid doing so for that very reason.)

  • http://dkarch.tumblr.com/ Derek

    Ok. I see where the critics are coming from with Bottle Shock. The plot is disjointed. And there is little resolution to various stories they’re trying to tell. Still, I love the movie and though it connected with a certain passion about wine in Napa. (Again, I agree the film has flaws.)

    That said (and not really intending to rehash ground already well-trod), it is absolutely unacceptable that they allowed some PR flaks to spam blogs with comments. (As a PR pro I’m embarrassed by it. If I hadn’t seen the movie already I would avoid doing so for that very reason.)

  • http://dkarch.tumblr.com Derek

    Ok. I see where the critics are coming from with Bottle Shock. The plot is disjointed. And there is little resolution to various stories they’re trying to tell. Still, I love the movie and though it connected with a certain passion about wine in Napa. (Again, I agree the film has flaws.)

    That said (and not really intending to rehash ground already well-trod), it is absolutely unacceptable that they allowed some PR flaks to spam blogs with comments. (As a PR pro I’m embarrassed by it. If I hadn’t seen the movie already I would avoid doing so for that very reason.)

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