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Terlato Wines International touts ‘Tangley Oaks’ brand

by TrevR on December 5, 2007

Terlato Wines International, which is involved with a whole host of Napa Valley wine brands such as Brandlin, Chimney Rock, Cuvaison Estate Wines, Markham Vineyards, Rutherford Hill and Terlato Family Vineyards, has announced the ‘launch’ of a new brand called Tangley Oaks.

Tangley Oaks from Terlato Wines InternationalTangley Oaks offers three classic varietals — Merlot, Chardonnay and Cabernet Sauvignon — from grapes grown in Napa Valley and Santa Barbara and targets the so-called ‘trade up’ consumer who is willing to spend a few extra bucks for something perceived to be a luxury item.

In a press release, Terlato’s chief marketing officer David Lane is quoted as saying:

“Tangley Oaks fulfills the desire in this growing segment for a luxury wine, approachably priced from $14 to $20, which provides consumers with a quality product from some of the most esteemed appellations in California…”

There’s no doubt the $14 – $20 price range is a sweet spot in the market, the question will be around the quality of the product. There have been a couple reviews of the 2003 Tangley Oaks Merlot that have appeared on the Internet, with descriptions saying the wine was “okay”.

Anyone else out there tried Tangley Oaks and have an opinion on it? If so, let us know in the comments.

[techtags: Napa, Napa Valley, wine, winery, Terlato Wines International, Terlato, Brandlin, Chimney Rock, Cuvaison Estate Wines, Markham Vineyards, Rutherford Hill Winery]

About the Author

has written 716 posts on The Cork Board. He was born and aged in the Napa Valley and has a passion for wine, writing and social media, which led him to co-found this blog in early 2007. Follow him on Twitter @TrevR.

  • Zinful1

    Terlato Wines does not own any of the wineries you have listed except for Terlato Family Vineyards. Terlato is a third-party wine sales and marketing firm.

  • Zinful1

    Terlato Wines does not own any of the wineries you have listed except for Terlato Family Vineyards. Terlato is a third-party wine sales and marketing firm.

  • Zinful1

    Terlato Wines does not own any of the wineries you have listed except for Terlato Family Vineyards. Terlato is a third-party wine sales and marketing firm.

  • http://www.uncork29.com/ TrevR

    Thanks Zinful1 for pointing out that oversight, we’ve updated the post to reflect that.

  • http://www.uncork29.com TrevR

    Thanks Zinful1 for pointing out that oversight, we’ve updated the post to reflect that.

  • Susan Holmer

    As a PR manager at Terlato, I thought I would join the conversation. The Terlato Wine Group is a family owned business that has been involved in every aspect of the premium wine industry. Its businesses range from producing and importing wine, to marketing and sales. Terlato Wine Group owned companies include Chimney Rock Winery, Rutherford Hill Winery, Alderbrook Vineyards and Winery and Terlato Family Vineyards in Napa Valley and Sonoma and Sanford Winery and Vineyards in Santa Barbara. Hope this clears up any confusion.

  • Susan Holmer

    As a PR manager at Terlato, I thought I would join the conversation. The Terlato Wine Group is a family owned business that has been involved in every aspect of the premium wine industry. Its businesses range from producing and importing wine, to marketing and sales. Terlato Wine Group owned companies include Chimney Rock Winery, Rutherford Hill Winery, Alderbrook Vineyards and Winery and Terlato Family Vineyards in Napa Valley and Sonoma and Sanford Winery and Vineyards in Santa Barbara. Hope this clears up any confusion.

  • http://www.uncork29.com/ TrevR

    Thanks Susan, very helpful! Happy Holidays.

  • http://www.uncork29.com TrevR

    Thanks Susan, very helpful! Happy Holidays.

  • Joe Delia

    I have finally coaxed my wife Terri onto the Red Wine Train (the Merlot car) and we have done a decent job plowing through various California vintages over the past few weeks (this it seems is both a blessing , and a curse ). One bottle that was particularly appealing was a 2003 Tangley Oaks Lot #7 from Napa. I had no idea what it was going to be like, and bought it based solely on the looks of its rather cool label and the pricepoint (~$15). When I pulled the cork, Terri pointed out that it read Rutherford Hill. Although a bit surprised (the label made no mention of Rutherford “Hill”, though the bottle was produced and bottled in Rutherford), in these days of second labels for prime vintners, I guess I shouldn’t have been. The quality of the wine was great, a little spicy with just enough oak to balance it, and smooth tannins. We both really liked it. I see that Rutherford Hill’s 2003 Merlot typically sells for around $25, and from what I have read this is similar/comparable. Last night we tried both a 2005 Mondavi Private Selection Merlot ($11) and a 2004 Kenwood Sonoma Merlot ($13), neither of which even came close to the Tangley Oaks. So the long story short is that you may be able to find some great, lower priced “second” labels of more expensive brands that drink very closely to the original.

  • Joe Delia

    I have finally coaxed my wife Terri onto the Red Wine Train (the Merlot car) and we have done a decent job plowing through various California vintages over the past few weeks (this it seems is both a blessing , and a curse ). One bottle that was particularly appealing was a 2003 Tangley Oaks Lot #7 from Napa. I had no idea what it was going to be like, and bought it based solely on the looks of its rather cool label and the pricepoint (~$15). When I pulled the cork, Terri pointed out that it read Rutherford Hill. Although a bit surprised (the label made no mention of Rutherford “Hill”, though the bottle was produced and bottled in Rutherford), in these days of second labels for prime vintners, I guess I shouldn’t have been. The quality of the wine was great, a little spicy with just enough oak to balance it, and smooth tannins. We both really liked it. I see that Rutherford Hill’s 2003 Merlot typically sells for around $25, and from what I have read this is similar/comparable. Last night we tried both a 2005 Mondavi Private Selection Merlot ($11) and a 2004 Kenwood Sonoma Merlot ($13), neither of which even came close to the Tangley Oaks. So the long story short is that you may be able to find some great, lower priced “second” labels of more expensive brands that drink very closely to the original.

  • http://www.uncork29.com/ TrevR

    Joe–this is excellent advice, thanks so much for sharing…and a big congrats to you on getting the wife on the Red Wine Train–that can sometimes be a tough road to hoe! :)

  • http://www.uncork29.com TrevR

    Joe–this is excellent advice, thanks so much for sharing…and a big congrats to you on getting the wife on the Red Wine Train–that can sometimes be a tough road to hoe! :)

  • Chris Robinson

    Just brought in the 2005 Tangley Oaks Merlot Lot #8 for my restaurant. The wine has a beautiful bouquet with notes of strawberry/cherry preserves, mocha, and a touch of tea leaf with a fine grained finish. I was quite surprised to find out the price point – thought it was a 25 dollar wine. Much more complex with a higher pedigree than I would attribute to a $14 wine.

  • Chris Robinson

    Just brought in the 2005 Tangley Oaks Merlot Lot #8 for my restaurant. The wine has a beautiful bouquet with notes of strawberry/cherry preserves, mocha, and a touch of tea leaf with a fine grained finish. I was quite surprised to find out the price point – thought it was a 25 dollar wine. Much more complex with a higher pedigree than I would attribute to a $14 wine.

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